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The following are approximately the first 1000 words from Chapter 1 of Jonar Nader’s book, How to Lose Friends and Infuriate Competitors. Finding problems to solutions: Beware the competitor within I am inclined to believe that every problem has a solution, and every solution comes with its own set of problems. As I travel around the world, I am often amazed at what’s on offer. I marvel at great ideas and I wonder who thought of them. As I spot clever gadgets and brilliant designs, I wonder why the innovation had not previously occurred to me, or why it had taken so long for something so useful to enter the market. Then, shortly afterwards, in stark contrast, I stand aghast at the incompetence that small and large corporations and institutions seem to exhibit with ease and disdain. I shake my head as I ponder under whose stewardship certain policies and…

The following are approximately the first 1000 words from the Introduction to Jonar Nader’s book, How to Lose Friends and Infuriate Lovers. Relationships are the most distracting of all human endeavours Undoubtedly, we can study love from many angles, including the psychological, theological, and philosophical. In addition, we can explore the various types of love, such as: the love that is shared between friends; the love that is freely given by parents towards their offspring; the love that is expressed by children towards one or both of their parents; the erotic love that is expressed affectionately towards random strangers with whom we crave to ignite a relationship; and the love of objects, pets, and external distractions from which some people derive solace or pleasure. Obviously, love is broad and complex, let alone mysterious; especially when we add the self-sacrificing love that is given to fellow-humans in need of assistance. This…

The following are approximately the first 1000 words from the Introduction of Jonar Nader’s book, How to Lose Friends and Infuriate People. Setting the scene In a nutshell, what this book is all about Leadership, management, and self-development principles are taught at hundreds of colleges to thousands of students who read millions of books. Yet companies collapse, businesses blunder, and friendships fail, while individuals and organisations are enslaved to inefficiency, inaccuracy, and instability. Why is it that so many popular techniques have a higher propensity to fail than to succeed? All this, despite the groundwork set by ‘gurus’ who urged us to: go on a quest in search of excellence; win friends and influence people; engage in serious creativity; capture moments of truth; and develop the seven habits of highly effective people. Beyond the hype, the real issues have been too controversial to communicate, too tough to tackle, and too…